Pupil Premium

Bordon Infant School pupil premium strategy statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School overview

Detail Data
School name Bordon Infant School
Number of pupils in school 178
Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils 14.6%
Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021/2022 to

2024/2025

Date this statement was published December 2021
Date on which it will be reviewed November 2022
Statement authorised by Governing Body
Pupil premium lead

Matt Greenhalgh

Headteacher

Governor / Trustee lead Brian Larby

Funding overview

Detail Amount
Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year £34,970
Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year £3,915
Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable) £0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£38,885

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

The money the school receives for children who are, or have been in the last 6 years, eligible for additional funding is used to ensure that every child has the very best opportunity to leave school with all of the skills, knowledge and emotional confidence to ensure that are ready for the next stage of their educational journey.

 

At Bordon Infants we believe the money should

  • Be used in a targeted way based on an annual identification of need
  • To overcome any barrier to learning
  • To support the whole family with a ‘wrap around’ package
  • Provide the very best quality of teaching and learning
  • To engage specialist services which enhance the provision we have in school
  • To target support for children whose education has been most impacted by two years of national and local lockdowns

 

As a school we believe

  • Every child can and will succeed
  • In raising the aspirations for all our children and families
  • In acting early as soon as need is identified
  • That every child in school will be, or will be supported to be confident, curious and creative
  • That every child will be respectful and learn the skills of working as part of a team
  • Most importantly we want every member of our school community to be happy at school

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number Detail of challenge
1 Pupil premium children have a significantly higher percentage of children with an identified Special Educational Need than non pupil premium Children
2 Historically in the school Pupil Premium Children’s attendance has been on average 1% lower than non pupil premium children
3 Assessment and school internal tracking shows that pupil premium children pick up phonics skills at a slower rate than non pupil premium children
4 Assessment and school internal tracking suggests that pupil premium children do not attain as highly in reading
5

Our assessments and observations indicate that the education and wellbeing of many of our disadvantaged pupils have been impacted by partial school closures to a greater extent than for other pupils. These findings are supported by national studies.

This has resulted in significant knowledge gaps leading to pupils falling further behind age-related expectations, especially in writing.

6 On entry assessment to Year R indicated that pupil premium children come into school with lower speaking and vocabulary skills than their peers

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

  Intended outcome Success criteria
1 For pupil premium children who also have an identified Special Educational Need to make excellent progress in all curriculum areas in line with schools high expectations Disadvantaged children who also have an identified area of special educational need make excellent progress in line with school expectations and comparable to non-disadvantaged children with an identified SEN
2 To achieve and sustain improved attendance for all pupils, particularly our disadvantaged pupils.

Sustained high attendance from 2024/25 demonstrated by:

 the overall absence rate for all pupils being no more than 4%, and the attendance gap between disadvantaged pupils and their non-disadvantaged peers being reduced from -0.9% to no more than -0.5%.

3 Improved phonic attainment among disadvantaged pupils. Year 1 phonics test outcomes in 2024/25 show that more than 75% of disadvantaged pupils met the expected standard.
4 Improved reading attainment among disadvantaged pupils. KS1 reading outcomes in 2024/25 show that more than 75% of disadvantaged pupils met the expected standard.
5 Improved writing attainment for disadvantaged pupils at the end of KS1.

KS1 writing outcomes in 2024/25 show that

 

6 Improved oral language skills and vocabulary among disadvantaged pupils. School assessments and observations indicate significantly improved spoken language among disadvantaged pupils. This is evident when triangulated with other sources of evidence, including engagement in lessons, book scrutiny and ongoing formative assessment.

 

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £19,386

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Professional Development from school LLP supporting high engagement in lessons

High quality teaching improves pupil outcomes, and effective professional development offers a crucial tool to develop teaching quality and enhance children’s outcomes in the classroom. LLP support in the careful designing of the professional development is key to improving pupil outcomes

EEF Effective Professional Development Guidance Report

1 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6
Professional Development from the Hampshire Inclusion project to enhance the practice of quality first teaching and inclusion across the whole school

High quality teaching improves pupil outcomes, and effective professional development offers a crucial tool to develop teaching quality and enhance children’s outcomes in the classroom.

EEF Effective Professional Development Guidance Report

An inclusive school removes barriers to learning and participation, provides an education that is appropriate to pupils’ needs, and promotes high standards and the fulfilment of potential for all pupils

EEF Special Education Needs in Mainstream Schools Guidance Report

1 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6
Professional Development from the  Maths Hub in developing the mastery approach in maths

Professional development should be used to raise the quality of practitioners’ knowledge of mathematics, of children’s mathematical development, and of effective mathematical pedagogy.

High quality teaching improves pupil outcomes, and effective professional development offers a crucial tool to develop teaching quality and enhance children’s outcomes in the classroom.

EEF Effective Professional Development Guidance Report

1 + 6
Purchase of standardised diagnostic assessments. SALFORD reading and SANDWELL maths with training for staff to ensure assessments are interpreted and administered correctly.

Standardised tests can provide reliable insights into the specific strengths and weaknesses of each pupil to help ensure they receive the correct additional support through interventions or teacher instruction:

Standardised tests | Assessing and Monitoring Pupil Progress | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

1 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6
Purchase of phonic based reading books to support parents at home in reinforcing the skills of decoding and comprehension taught in school there by increasing parental confidence and ensuring children are more successful readers at home

Phonics approaches have a strong evidence base indicating a positive impact on pupils, particularly from disadvantaged backgrounds. Evidence suggest that children experiencing success with reading is a key component to reading progress

EEF Literacy KS1 Guidance Report

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/phonics

 

3 + 4
Purchase of a new writing scheme for Year 2, Oxford University Press Big Writing adventure to support the embedding of key writing skills thereby developing fluency in writing for the most disadvantaged children

Although there is less evidence of good writing strategies than reading Children need to be introduced to, then practise, planning, drafting, revising, and editing with feedback from the teacher and from their peers. The aim is for them to increase the fluency of these skills and techniques so that they become automatic

EEF Literacy KS1 Guidance Report

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/guidance-reports/literacy-ks-1

5

Additional time for English Leader to support the schools phonics scheme. This will

      Provide bespoke CPD for all staff

      Ensure the phonics scheme is responsive to children’s needs, accelerating progress

      Support adaptations to the scheme where appropriate

High quality teaching improves pupil outcomes, and effective professional development offers a crucial tool to develop teaching quality and enhance children’s outcomes in the classroom.

EEF Effective Professional Development Guidance Report

Phonics approaches have a strong evidence base indicating a positive impact on pupils, particularly from disadvantaged backgrounds. Evidence suggest that children experiencing success with reading is a key component to reading progress

EEF Literacy KS1 Guidance Report

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/phonics

3 + 4 + 5 + 6

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: ££19,415

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Provide school-led tutoring for pupils whose education has been most impacted by the pandemic. A significant proportion of the pupils who receive tutoring will be disadvantaged, including those who are high attainder’s.

Tuition targeted at specific needs and knowledge gaps can be an effective method to support low attaining pupils or those falling behind, both one-to-one:

One to one tuition | EEF (educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

And in small groups:

Small group tuition | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

1 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6
Additional Year 2 phonics sessions focused on the most disadvantaged and those that did not achieve the required standard in the Year 1 phonics assessment

Phonics approaches have a strong evidence base indicating a positive impact on pupils, particularly from disadvantaged backgrounds. Targeted phonics interventions have been shown to be more effective when delivered as regular sessions over a period up to 12 weeks:

Phonics | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

3 + 4
Additional SENCo time to ensure high quality interventions compliment high quality in class teaching. Work with and support LSA in delivery of interventions and communication with teachers

Adopting a tiered approach to support and carefully considering when targeted interventions might be appropriate and when we may want to seek additional specialist support is key to ensuring all children make progress The integration of any intervention with curriculum teaching is vital for the success of the intervention

EEF Special Education Needs in Mainstream Schools Guidance Report

1
Purchase the Language link program and intervention

Targeted support has been shown to be detrimental to children if they have been missallocated to an intervention. The assessment aspect of this intervention insures that children are given the correct level of support when needed

EEF Special Education Needs in Mainstream Schools Guidance Report

1
Purchase the Lexplore program and intervention

Targeted support has been shown to be detrimental to children if they have been missallocated to an intervention. The assessment aspect of this intervention insures that children are given the correct level of support when needed

EEF Special Education Needs in Mainstream Schools Guidance Report

1
Purchase Provision map as a means to support SEN assessment being regular and purposeful to help quickly identify where interventions are not effective improve communication

Interventions should be carefully targeted through identification and assessment of need.

EEF Special Education Needs in Mainstream Schools Guidance Report

1
To provide Speech and language therapy over and above that available on the NHS

Having a private speech therapist regularly review children supports the school in building an ongoing holistic understanding of children’s needs. This also supports the cycle of assess, plan, do and review to respond to children’s changing learning needs

EEF Special Education Needs in Mainstream Schools Guidance Report

6

  

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £1,460

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed

To review the schools PSHE scheme Jigsaw to ensure it meets the Relationship and Sex Education Needs of the children in the school.

To provide effective CPD support to enable staff to teach it at the highest level

RSE supports all children to grow up happy, healthy and safe. It provides them with the knowledge they need to manage the opportunities and challenges of modern Britain

DfE guidance on teaching Relationship’s and Sex and Health Education

2 + 5
Whole staff training on behavior management and anti-bullying approaches with the aim of developing our school ethos and improving behavior across school.

Both targeted interventions and universal approaches can have positive overall effects:

Behaviour interventions | EEF (educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

2 + 5

Following the recent lockdowns to focus on embedding a clear vision for attendance linked to our school values and high expectations

This will involve

  • training and release time for new staff to develop and implement new procedures
  • Time with school ESLA supporting children
  • Parent support with ELSA and/or SENCo
The DfE guidance has been informed by engagement with schools that have significantly reduced levels of absence and persistent absence. 2
Contingency fund for acute issues. Based on our experiences and those of similar schools to ours, we have identified a need to set a small amount of funding aside to respond quickly to needs that have not yet been identified. 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6

 

Total budgeted cost: £ 40,261

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

School planned success criteria

  1. Pupil Premium children with no SEN need achieve in line with non-Pupil Premium children in, reading and maths across the school
  2. Pupil Premium children with a SEN or EAL need make progress from their starting points in line with school high expectations
  3. All children who are considered Look After or ever have been considered Look After make progress in line with expectations or where there is a danger of them not making Age Related Expectations progress is accelerated
  4. Service children and their families have welfare support necessary for the children to make progress in line with school expectations and achieve Age Related expectations
  1. Pupil premium children with no SEN achieved 4% lower than non-pupil premium without any SEN in reading and 6% above in maths
  2. This was impossible to make a judgement on due to national and local lockdowns significantly disrupting learning for all children
  3. All looked after children made appropriate progress (figures are not given due to the small size of this group)
  4. All service children achieved ARE in reading, writing and maths

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme Provider
   
   

Service pupil premium funding (optional)

For schools that receive this funding, you may wish to provide the following information:

Measure Details
How did you spend your service pupil premium allocation last academic year?  
What was the impact of that spending on service pupil premium eligible pupils?  

Further information (optional)

Our Pupil Premium Strategy is interwoven with all other areas of school improvement. The areas we are working on as a school that are not being support by the pupil premium find are

    The school’s curriculum intent and implementation are embedded securely and consistently across the school. Across all parts of the school, series of lessons contribute well to delivering the curriculum intent. To be successful in this we are working to ensure that strong subject leadership, highly effective school systems and impactful monitoring ensures a curriculum that meets the needs of all children enabling them to make strong progress. The impact of this will be that Monitoring and data all tie in to enable subject leader to discuss with confidence the strengths and development points in their subject. Also subject leaders are clear on how to strengthen their subject for the following academic year

      Pupils behave with consistently high levels of respect for others. They play a highly positive role in creating a school environment in which commonalities are identified and celebrated, difference is valued and nurtured. To be successful in this we are working to ensure that specific links between the school value ‘Be Respectful’ and politeness and manners are made with the children. This combined with staff high expectations and modelling ensures children’s manners and politeness are exemplary. Also that staff feel well supported in all aspects of behaviour management and in engaging the children in creating a positive school environment. The impact of this will be that children are able to explain what the word manners means and how they should act in school. Good manners are embedded throughout the school community, and parents are clear on the school expectations and know this is an area we are developing this year

      The school consistently promotes the extensive personal development of pupils. The curriculum extends beyond the academic, vocational or technical and provides for pupils’ broader development. The school’s work to enhance pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is of a high quality. To be successful in this we are working to ensure that through a strong curriculum and specialist weeks such as School Values Week/Science week/ Art Week the school provides a wide and rich set of experiences designed to inspire the children. That opportunities are identified, and enhanced, within the curriculum to broaden and enrich children’s experiences. These are carefully planned to meet the needs of our school community and that the school starts a full review of its curriculum in respect to developing British values. Clear strengths and development areas are drawn up and work begun on strengthening this aspect of children’s personal development. To be completed the following academic year. The impact of this will be that the topic weeks have had a lasting positive impact on the children and they routinely talk about them as highlights of the year. Enrichment activities have been carefully planned to cater for the gaps that our school community may have. Each subject area also has enrichment activities planned for each year groups. Finally all staff are clear on the road map for the following academic year which will embed British Values into our school culture and curriculum

      Leaders ensure that teachers receive focused and highly effective professional development. Teachers’ subject, pedagogical and pedagogical content knowledge consistently build and develop over time. This consistently translates into improvements in the teaching of the curriculum. To be successful in this we are working to ensure that strong leadership from governors enables the governors to have real clarity about school improvement, strengths and development areas. They can lead with confidence and knowledge. Safeguarding is effective. The whole school has created a culture of vigilance where children’s welfare is actively promoted

We review our pupil premium expenditure and any actions not considered to have been effective or value for money are discontinued. We use numerous research documents from the EEF as well as Ofsted and the DfE publications to support us in developing our strategy based on our children’s identified needs.

The Headteacher of the school is the pupil premium lead for the school as we believe that our most disadvantaged children need the strongest leadership and all actions designed to ensure that they thrive and achieve are given the highest priority.

 

Bordon Infant School Pupil Premium Statement 2021-22